The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)


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He contends that the aims of antebellum southern nationalists were far from consistent and in no simple or teleological way spawned the literary nationalism of the Confederacy. Hutchison's second chapter explores the cosmopolitan, international ambitions of Confederate writers, particularly Augusta Jane Evans in her wartime novel Macaria.

However much they wanted to demonstrate the distinctiveness of southern culture and literature, Evans and other Confederate authors aimed to create something greater than merely a provincial literature. Themselves engaged with English and European literature, they hoped to write for international audiences and contribute to a transnational republic of letters. They aspired to produce great literature that would be recognized as such in the transatlantic marketplace, enabling the Confederacy to claim not just national distinctiveness but national distinction.

Inasmuch as they both analyze the transnational nature of Confederate nationalism, Paul Quigley's recent historical study, Shifting Grounds: Nationalism and the American South, , and Apples and Ashes complement each other very well.

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Evans resisted localism and provincialism in Macaria by refusing to ground the novel in a particular locale. Instead, the events of the novel centered around an unnamed southern community, a place that arguably represented what was universal in all southern communities. In this, Hutchison argues, Evans effectively nurtured Confederate national identity by obscuring, even denying, the particularities of the local.

Not so the occasional poetry appearing in Confederate newspapers, the subject of Hutchison's third chapter. This hastily written poetry, he argues, often engaged with the politics of the moment. It also engaged with the politics of place, addressing local and state communities, occasionally to the point of being incomprehensible to those who lacked familiarity with the politics and people of those communities. While Hutchison acknowledges how localism and nationalism could abet one another, the pronounced localism of much of this poetry, he emphasizes, could and ultimately did "threaten the coherence of national community" Hutchison's fourth chapter traces the various nationalistic appropriations of " Dixie " as both Confederates and northerners sought to claim the popular song and invest it with different nationalistic and local meanings.

Originally written as a minstrel song expressing an ambivalent longing for the slave South, white Confederates appropriated and revised it as a song celebrating their affective attachment to their new nation. At the same time, unionist versions of the song appeared that used the catchy melody to condemn rebellion and foretell the punishment that would be visited on Confederate traitors.

Hutchison's fascinating analysis of "Dixie" reveals the song to have been a contentious transnational commodity, a "fungible cultural form onto which various constituencies [South and North] were cued to project their nationalist fantasies" Apple and Ashes's final chapter on Loreta Janeta Velazquez 's postwar memoir The Woman in Battle recounts the Cuban-born Velazquez's movements through the Confederacy, Europe, South America, and the American West during the Civil War era and her various transnational adventures involving international finance, blockade running, and a daring aborted raid out of Canada.

Hutchison argues that while Velazquez's narrative is unusual in recounting the tale of a woman who masqueraded as a man in order to fight in the war, it typified the decidedly transnational nature of the American Civil War and of Confederate literary nationalism. Hutchison's readings are consistently smart, provocative, and engaging. Apples and Ashes convincingly demonstrates the fundamentally transnational nature of Confederate literary nationalism and, arguably, nationalism more generally.

It shows that as we increasingly attend to transnational currents in culture and thought, nationalism and the concept of the nation remain vital and rewarding objects of study. If there is a weakness to Apples and Ashes , it is that Hutchison articulates no central, clear, explicit argument about Confederate literary nationalism or the relationship between literature and nationalism.

Mary Ann Gwinn. Capital dames : the Civil War and the women of Washington, The Civil War Dictionary. Chancellorsville, The Souls of the Brave. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave.

Catalog Record: North & South : the magazine of Civil War conflict | HathiTrust Digital Library

Collector's Library of the Civil War. Why the Confederacy Lost. Boritt Editor. History , Military History , Civil War. Schroll Collection. An Undivided Union. Blue and Gray on Land. A Lieutenant at Eighteen.


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In the Saddle. Troubled refuge : struggling for freedom in the Civil War.

Campus Life

The Children of pride : selected letters of the family of the Rev. Charles Colcock Jones from the years , with the addition of several previously unpublished letters. Children of Pride. Patriotic gore; studies in the literature of the American Civil War. Reilly, Jr. Donald M.

Campus Life

Susan F. Suggested additional reading: Martha S. Morning : Participant research time. Additional bibliography: Gary L. Borritt, and Mark E.

20 - The Civil War in American Thought

Neely, Jr. Cynthia Mills and Pamela H. Simpson Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, Simpson, eds. William A. Kittrell Rushing, and Roy Morris, Jr. Judy L.

Battle Of Gettysburg - Civil War Documentary

Larson Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, Tour of New-York Historical Society and hands-on activities. Additional bibliography: Georgia B. Catherine Hoover Voorsanger and John K. Morning : Sessions with Sarah Burns on painting the war.

The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)
The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865 (Civil War America)

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